Social Sciences & Cross Cultural Studies Division

Social sciences courses are seen as a foundation for VIU students’ social skills in order to be sensitive to the human condition with self-confidence and self-understanding.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Interpret human behavior and develop skills to successfully interact with individuals at all levels of society.
  2. Critically analyze the organization of society and the role of individuals and groups in the larger society.
  3. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of ethical norms to exercise independent judgment and ethical decision-making.
Distribution of Courses (2 Courses/6 Credit Hours):
Course Code Course Name Credit Hours
GOVT 120

Prerequisite: None

This course compares political processes and governing structures in European nations, the former Soviet Union, China, and the United States.

3
GOVT 130

Prerequisite: None

This is an introductory course in the study of international relations. Students will examine important historical and contemporary themes in international relations and discuss the main set of theories in the discipline: realism, idealism, and constructivism. Critical themes and developments to be discussed in the course include global and regional conflict and war, cooperation, international law, terrorism, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, ethnic conflict and peacekeeping, globalization and international trade and finance, and international organizations and regionalism.

3
GOVT 140

Prerequisite: None

The class is designed to provide students with a core understanding of American politics and society and inspire their interest and possibly involvement in the American political system. It is comprised of three main modules. The first part of the course explores the historic, cultural and religious origins of the American state and focuses on the issues of American exceptionalism, national identity, religious roots and early political development. The second module centers on the key principles, institutions, and decision-making processes of the American political system, and evaluates the basis strengths and weaknesses of American modern governance. Finally, module three, examines some of the most current and prominent dilemmas in modern American life, including the politics of race, social security, health care and gender issues.

3
GEOG 101

Prerequisite: None

This course provides a survey of physical, cultural, and economic aspects of world regions. It serves as an introduction to how constituent parts of the world differ from one another in their associated resources, cultures, and economics. Attention is given to the interrelationships, interdependencies, and associations that bind together the diverse communities of the world.

3
HIST 101

Prerequisite: None

World History is the only course offering students an overview of the entire history of humankind. The major emphasis is on the study of significant people, events, and issues from the earliest times to the present. Traditional historical points of reference in world history are identified as students analyze important events and issues in western civilization as well as in civilizations in other parts of the world.

 3
PSYC 101

Prerequisite: None

This course examines human and animal behavior, relating experimental studies to practical problems. It includes topics such as learning, memory, motivation, stress, emotion, intelligence, development, personality, therapy, psychopathology, and social psychology.

3
SOCI 101

Prerequisite: None

This course examines patterns in political institutions, public policy, and conflict within and between communities and interest groups.

3